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Join Janssen in helping making the invisible, visible this World IBD Day

 
 
Join Janssen in helping making the invisible, visible this World IBD Day
 
 
 
 

For the ninth year, the European Federation of Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis Associations (EFCCA) is co-ordinating World IBD Day which aims to “unite people worldwide in their fight against Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis”, with this year’s theme:  Making the invisible, visible. World IBD Day is led by patient organisations representing 50 countries across five continents.

Janssen’s vision is a world where auto-immune disease is a thing of the past; we aim to provide hope and support for patients and their families with immune and inflammatory diseases. There is no cure, no known cause, and little public understanding of the pain and chronic suffering which inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients cope with every day of their lives.1 It has a debilitating impact on people living with the condition, and the impact of IBD goes far beyond physical symptoms.2 You may not realise that someone is struggling with IBD, as the symptoms can be invisible.

 

To mark World IBD Day this year, we want to better understand the challenges that people with IBD face in their everyday life and help reduce the stigma surrounding the disease.

We therefore invite you to join our conversation on Twitter: our #TalkIBD tweet chat is taking place from 1–2pm CET on Friday 17 May. Follow the hashtags #TalkIBD and #WorldIBDDay to get involved in the discussion about what everyday life with IBD is like. Together, let’s continue the conversation.

 

In order to continue raising awareness of IBD on World IBD Day and beyond, Janssen is also partnering with EFCCA to develop a series of animations that convey the reality of living with IBD and the impact of the condition, entitled My IBD Journey. You can watch the animations here.

 

About Inflammatory bowel diseases:

IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) refers collectively to a group of chronic inflammatory diseases, the most common being Crohn’s disease, which affects the whole of the digestive tract, and ulcerative colitis, which affects only the large intestine.3

 

 

 

 

 

References

  1. Crohn’s & Colitis UK. Crohn’s Disease. Available at: https://www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/about-inflammatory-bowel-disease/crohns-disease. (Last accessed April 2019).
  2. Crohn’s & Colitis UK. Ulcerative Colitis. Available at: https://www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk/about-inflammatory-bowel-disease/ulcerative-colitis. (Last accessed April 2019).
  3. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention: What is inflammatory bowel disease? Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/ibd/what-is-IBD.htm. (Last accessed April 2019).