Skip to main content

Search

Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

Cardiovascular and Metabolism
 

Cardiovascular and Metabolism

Cardiovascular and metabolic (CVM) diseases are the number one cause of death worldwide, leading to an estimated 31 percent of all deaths 1. Cardiovascular diseases are disorders affecting the heart and blood vessels, whereas metabolic diseases are disorders that impact metabolism (chemical processes within the body). A range of genetic, environmental and socioeconomic factors play a role in the development of CVM disease, and the prevalence of these diseases is growing, impacting patients, their families and healthcare systems. A collective approach to prevention, early detection and intervention, and monitoring of disease progression is required to address the increasing burden of disease.

 

 

Our work in Cardiovasccular and Metabolism

Our Work in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

Janssen has an enduring commitment to researching the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Our aim is to develop innovative healthcare solutions that will significantly improve outcome for patients. As such, we are building a comprehensive approach to diabetes care as well as cardiovascular disease, uncovering new therapies we hope will improve the quality of life for patients. Our mission is global, local and personal. Together, we can reshape the future of cardiovascular and metabolic disease prevention and treatment.

 

 

 

Disease areas of focus

Our Disease Areas of Focus

Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes; a serious condition where the level of glucose in the blood is too high. About 90 percent of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes 2, where the insulin made by the pancreas can’t work properly, or the pancreas can’t make enough insulin, leading to an increase in blood glucose level. Over time, elevated blood glucose levels can lead to complications from damage to various organs, including the heart, eyes and kidneys.

Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a long-term condition characterised by a gradual loss of kidney function. It's a common condition often associated with ageing but can also be caused by disorders such as diabetes and high blood pressure. As kidney function declines, levels of waste product in blood can build up, leading to illness and complications such as anaemia (low blood count) and muscle weakness 3 .

Hypertension is another name for high blood pressure, when the flow of the blood applies too much force against the walls of the blood vessels. Acute causes of hypertension include stress, but it can also occur on its own, or it can result from an underlying condition, such as kidney disease. Unmanaged hypertension can lead to severe complications and increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, and death 4.

 

 

 

 

References:

  1. World Health Organisation (WHO). Cardiovascular Disease. 

2.      Diabetes.co.uk. Type 2 Diabetes.

3.      MedScape. Chronic Kideny Disease: Practice Esssentials, Background, Pathophysiology.

4.      World Health Organisation (WHO): Hypertension Fact Sheet May 2019.