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Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide, with over 1.8 million new cases in 2018 alone.1 The most common hereditary CRC syndromes are familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and lynch syndrome (LS). Frequent clinical surveillance, such as colonoscopy, and surgery, such as colectomy, are the only ways to manage these conditions and prevent progression to CRC. Surgery often results in morbidity and decreased quality of life.2

Janssen Oncology, in collaboration with the World Without Disease Accelerator (WWDA), aims to reduce the incidence of CRC and morbidity by intervening earlier in the disease process. For example, chronic inflammation is known to be a driver of many disease pathologies and thought to underlie the development and progression of pre-cancerous polyps that are characteristic of FAP and LS. Thus, the team is exploring ways to inhibit the processes that lead to chronic inflammation associated with FAP and LS, and ultimately intercept CRC.

Click here to learn more about Janssen Oncology and their approach to cancer interception.


1 Colorectal cancer statistics. Continuous Update Project (CUP). Date accessed: December 13, 2018.

2 Postoperative Complications: Looking Forward to a Safer Future. Clin Colon Rectal Surg. 2016 Sep; 29(3): 246–252. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1584501.

World Without Disease Accelerator

World Without Disease Accelerator

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